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GRAPHIC: Police release body cam footage of officer-involved shooting

Police investigating the scene after an officer involved shooting on June 25, 2017.

Body camera footage released Monday by the Oklahoma City Police Department reveals what happened in the moments leading up to an officer-involved shooting.

The shooting, which happened in the 1500 block of S. Robinson Avenue on the afternoon of June 25, resulted in the death of 24-year-old Deveonte L. Johnson.

A witness reportedly called police after seeing Johnson fire gunshots at passing cars.

According to police, the first officer to arrive, Brandon Lee, found Johnson sitting on some steps with a gun in his hand. Johnson got up and began moving towards Lee. Lee took cover behind his police cruiser and waited for backup to arrive.

The body camera footage released by Oklahoma City police Monday is from a camera being worn by Officer Clayton Sargeant, who arrived to the scene minutes after Lee.

The video shows Officer Sargeant exit his patrol car and immediately begin demanding Johnson to drop the gun he is seen carrying.

As Sargeant moves closer to the scene, you can see Officer Lee standing next to his patrol car. The two take cover together, as Johnson is seen coming around the corner of the patrol car. Shots are fired seconds later.

"There are multiple times that the officers are telling the suspect to drop the gun,” said Capt. Bo Mathew, an OKCPD spokesperson. “He does not adhere to their directions and Officer Sargeant then disarmed his firearm three times.”

Mathews says Johnson was hit twice. He was transported to a local hospital, where he was pronounced dead. An investigation into his death immediately followed and Officer Sargeant was placed on paid administrative leave.

"He is still on restricted duty,” Mathews said. The case was investigated by our homicide unit. It is going to be turned over to the Oklahoma County District Attorney's office in about two weeks."

From there, the case will be handed over to the police department’s office of professional standards for internal review.

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